Abortion Onscreen
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Abortion portrayal

Grantchester (television)

Grantchester
Notes:

Alice is suspected of having an affair and murdering her abusive husband with her friend Frank as an accomplice. A detective suspects her because he finds a bloody garment in her room. She isn't guilty of those crimes, but instead of having an illegal abortion. She confesses that Frank drove her to the office of a dentist who also does abortions, and that she didn't want to have a baby with a dangerous man. She explicitly states that she does not regret the abortion, but wonders if she will be forgiven for "the sin" of standing by while her husband abuses another woman, his secretary. 
 

Keywords: past abortion.

Episodes: Episode 3.4
Release date: July 12, 2017
Time setting: Past (1900-1972)
Geographical setting: Non-US (England)
Abortion legality: Illegal
Health outcomes: None
Character age: 30-39
Genre: Drama, Historical
Network: PBS

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ANSIRH is a program within the UCSF Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health and is a part of UCSF's Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences.

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