News from ANSIRH
Search publications
Search publications
Research on Abortion
Research on Abortion
Research at ANSIRH
Research at ANSIRH
Research on Contraception
Research on Contraception
Research on Culture
Research on Culture
International Research
International Research
Research on Policy
Research on Policy
ANSIRH publications
ANSIRH publications
ANSIRH publications
ANSIRH publications
ANSIRH publications & resources
ANSIRH publications & resources
ANSIRH publications
ANSIRH publications
ANSIRH training materials
ANSIRH training materials
ANSIRH training materials
ANSIRH training materials
ANSIRH in the Media
ANSIRH in the Media
ANSIRH publications & resources
ANSIRH publications & resources
ANSIRH resources
ANSIRH resources
ANSIRH resources
ANSIRH resources

ANSIRH News

Reflecting on Whole Woman’s Health v Hellerstedt

On June 27, 2016, the Supreme Court announced its decision in the Whole Woman’s Health v Hellerstedt case brought by Texas abortion providers against the state of Texas. ANSIRH’s Carole Joffe organized and contributed to a symposium on the Court’s decision, with contributions from Professor David Cohen of Drexel University, Stephanie Toti, the lead counsel in Whole Woman’s Health, and Dr. Bhavik Kumar, a Texas abortion provider. Carole Joffe’s contribution to the symposium, titled, “Reflections on Whole Woman's Health v Hellerstedt: savoring victory, anticipating further challenges,” is available now from Contraception.

Read more...

Ohio law restricting medication abortion did not improve health outcomes

This study examined the impact of an Ohio law that went into effect in 2011, restricting the provision of medication abortion to an outdated FDA protocol. Women who had medication abortions after the law was implemented were three times more likely to require at least one additional medical treatment to complete the abortion than women prior to the law. They also required more clinic visits, had more side effects, and incurred greater costs. These results suggest that mandating adherence to an outdated protocol forced Ohio doctors to treat women with a protocol that did not appear to have any added benefit to women’s health.

Read more...

Military women, Zika and abortion: A letter to the editor

Responding to 33 U.S. Service Members Have Contracted Zika, Pentagon Says, published on August 3, 2016 in the New York Times, ANSIRH’s Dan Grossman and Carole Joffe pointed out that the article was “noteworthy for what it did not mention: the possibility that exposed servicewomen or sexual partners of exposed servicemen could need an abortion because of the risk of fetal malformations associated with Zika infection,” and added “we owe it to those serving our country to make available to them the full spectrum of necessary reproductive health services, including contraceptive methods to prevent unintended pregnancy and testing for the Zika virus, as well as abortion services for those who request them.”

Read more...

What can the abortion rights movement learn from marriage equality’s success?

When people compare the marriage equality movement and the abortions rights movement, they often explain their very different rates of success by pointing to the content of each movement, suggesting that marriage equality is winning because it is about “love” while abortion rights is losing because it is about “sex.” Drawing on the literature on social movement success, ANSIRH’s Katrina Kimport challenges this notion in her article, “Divergent Successes: What the Abortion Rights Movement Can Learn from Marriage Equality’s Success,” available in Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health.

Read more...

Study: Telemedicine provision of medication abortion in Alaska has huge benefits

A new study from Ibis Reproductive Health and ANSIRH titled, "Telemedicine provision of medical abortion in Alaska: Through the provider’s lens,” released in the Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, found that telemedicine provision of medication abortion in Alaska facilitated a more patient-centered approach to care, allowing women to access services earlier in pregnancy, have greater choice in abortion procedure type, and to be seen closer to home.

Read more...

Op-Ed: Texas "Woman's Right to Know" booklet lacks evidence

The day after the Supreme Court ruled that parts of Texas’s abortion law, known as House Bill 2, was unconstitutional, the Department of State Health Services (DSHS) unveiled a revised version of the “Woman’s Right To Know” booklet — a document that physicians are required by law to give to women seeking an abortion that provides them with accurate information to help inform their decision.

DSHS states on its website that “[r]evisions to the booklet will be guided by peer-reviewed scientific and medical literature, resources from professional medical organizations, and government health sources.”

Read more...

US policy restricting public funding of abortion is global outlier

ANSIRH and Ibis Reproductive Health released a new study, “Public funding for abortion where broadly legal,” in the journal Contraception. The study includes 80 countries with liberal or liberally interpreted abortion laws. We found that the vast majority (74%) cover abortion using public funding, either fully (34 countries) or partially (25). These countries are home to 87% of the world’s female population of reproductive age. In contrast, the United States is one of only 10 countries that only cover abortion in exceptional cases such as rape, incest, or threat to the pregnant woman’s life. An additional 11 countries provide no public funding at all for abortion.

Read more...

Self-injection of the contraceptive DMPA

Subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC), often known as “Depo Provera”, is a low-dose formulation that non-medical personnel can administer. The study sought to determine women’s interest in self-administration of DMPA-SC. Overall, 21% of women reported interest in self-administration, particularly if they were currently or had previously used DMPA. Women reporting difficulty obtaining or refilling a prescription were twice as likely to report interest in DMPA-SC compared to women with no difficulty.  Interest was driven by a desire to reduce return visits to facilities for repeat injections.

Read more...

In their own words: Experiences of women denied abortions

ANSIRH’s Global Turnaway Study team has released a beautifully animated short film portraying the personal stories of women across the world who face barriers to accessing legal abortion. The film highlights the experiences of women in Bangladesh, Colombia, Nepal, South Africa, Tunisia, and the United States.

Read more...

ANSIRH study shows that few women visit pregnancy resource centers (PRCs) because they are considering abortion

The study looked at the reasons why women visit Pregnancy Resource Centers (PRCs), also known as crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs). The majority of women visiting the study PRC came for parenting resources, such as diapers and other childcare items. Only 2% of clients sought counseling on abortion.

Read more...

Pages

Banner photo: © Aura Orozco-Fuentes

Subscribe to Articles

Sign up for the ANSIRH Listserv

Want to stay up to date on the latest research and news from ANSIRH? Join our listserv.

Contact us

Connect with us on social media

ANSIRH is a program within the UCSF Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health and is a part of UCSF's Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences.

©2015 The Regents of the University of California